Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Shoulder FAQ

Question:

When I was pregnant, the doctor took ultrasound pictures of the baby. Now I've torn the rotator cuff in my shoulder. They are going to use ultrasound to look for the tear. Is this the same test?

Answer:

Pretty close. In both cases sound waves are projected through the skin and soft tissues and bounce back. The result is an image of the structures underneath the skin. Ultrasound can be used to look at unborn babies, heart defects, tumors, and gallstones.

The frequency of the sound wave varies depending on its use and the tissue being examined. A broad-bandwidth frequency between five and 13 MHz (mega-hertz) is used to look at the rotator cuff around the shoulder. Extremely high frequency cleans dental and surgical tools.

R. Sean Churchill, MD, et al. Rotator Cuff Ultrasonography: Diagnostic Capabilities. In Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. January/February 2004. Vol. 12. No. 1. Pp. 6-11.

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
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