Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Hip News

Changing a Fused Hip to a New Hip Joint

Even though hip joint replacements are available, doctors sometimes fuse the joint instead. This is often the case with young patients who have severe hip damage on one side. Most of the time, the damage is related to some form of arthritis. Sometimes an accident or injury leads to infection and destruction of the hip joint. Tuberculosis that affects the bones is another cause of hip joint problems.

Doctors try to fuse the joint in a way that still allows the patient to change or convert to a new joint later on. Most hip fusions last at least 25 years before conversion to a new joint. When the patient has back, hip, or knee pain that gets in the way of everyday life, it may be time to convert the fusion.

The conversion from a fused joint to a new hip joint is difficult. An experienced surgeon is needed. Even then, problems after the operation can occur. Complications after conversion include nerve damage, infection, loosening of the implant, and hip dislocation. Rarely, a bone may fracture.

Records kept over the years by doctors who have done this surgery are helpful. Several studies report that converting a fused hip to a total hip replacement has a good outcome. There are some possible problems, but these are limited with a good surgeon.


Atul B. Joshi, FRCS, et al. Conversion of a Fused Hip to Total Hip Arthroplasty. In The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. August 2002. Vol. 84-A. No. 8. Pp. 1335-1341.

00/00/0000

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
All content provided by eORTHOPOD® is a registered trademark of Medical Multimedia Group, L.L.C.. Content is the sole property of Medical Multimedia Group, LLC and used herein by permission.

Our Specialties

Where Does It Hurt?

Our Locations

  Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook Follow us on YouTube
Follow us on Twitter