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Hip News

Hip Tips for Hockey Players

Coaches, trainers, and athletes are always looking for ways to prevent injuries. Hockey players are no different. Strains of the inner thigh muscles are among the most common problems in ice hockey. These muscles are called the hip adductors.

The best way to prevent injuries is to find out how often the injury occurs, and what the risk factors are for that injury. Then researchers can look for ways to reduce the risks and the number of injuries. Preseason testing of muscle length and strength is important in this process.

This study measured the muscle strength of the hip muscles on the inside and outside of the hip. The adductor muscles should be at least 80 percent as strong as the muscles along the outside of the hip, the hip abductors. If the ratio is not 80 percent, an exercise program is advised.

Active training programs can be used to prevent adductor muscle strains in hockey players. This prevents injury and results in a less severe strain when it does occur. Because of this program, injured players don't miss as much playing time. Preseason hip strengthening is advised for some hockey players, namely those whose hip adductors have much less strength than their hip abductors.


Timothy F. Tyler, PT, ATC, et al. The Effectiveness of a Preseason Exercise Program to Prevent Adductor Muscle Strains in Professional Ice Hockey Players. In The American Journal of Sports Medicine. September/October 2002. Vol. 30. No. 5. Pp. 680-683.

10/22/2002

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
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