Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Hip FAQ

Question:

I'm slightly overweight and worried about the effect of that on my new hip replacement. How much overweight is "too much"?

Answer:

First of all, the new hip joint is likely to reduce your pain and improve your function. It's up to you to now increase your activity level.

If you can keep your intake of calories the same while increasing your activity, then you might be able to lose some weight. At the very least, you should work toward not gaining any more weight.

Studies do show that obese patients put increased loads on their joints. Grossly obese people may reduce their activity enough to balance out load on the joint.

A recent study was done looking at body mass index (BMI) and hip motion and function after hip replacement. Hip function was less as body weight increased but overall the change was minimal.

Matthew Moran, MRCSEd, et al. Does Body Mass Index Affect the Early Outcome of Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty? In The Journal of Arthroplasty. October 2005. Vol. 20. No. 7. Pp. 866-869.

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
All content provided by eORTHOPOD® is a registered trademark of Medical Multimedia Group, L.L.C.. Content is the sole property of Medical Multimedia Group, LLC and used herein by permission.

Our Specialties

Where Does It Hurt?

Our Locations

  Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook Follow us on YouTube
Follow us on Twitter