Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Hip FAQ

Question:

I had a knee arthroscopy to repair a torn medial meniscus. Now I see they can do this on the hip, too. I'm having some hip pain. Can they do an arthroscope and see what's wrong?

Answer:

Hip arthroscopy has actually been around since the late 1980s. As technology has improved, arthroscopy has improved. Hip arthroscopy is easier to do now and less invasive than even five years ago.

Surgeons are starting to narrow down which patients are the best ones to have a hip arthroscopy. It works well for problems inside a joint that has very little arthritis. Any loose pieces of bone or cartilage can be removed with a hip arthroscopy. Tears of the cartilage called the labrum can be identified and repaired.

Other hip conditions investigated and treated arthroscopically include synovial problems, bone lesions, and septic or infectious arthritis. In the future, we may expect to see even more conditions diagnosed and treated arthroscopically.

Research will help show which patients have a good or poor response to this procedure. Patients can be chosen more carefully for a successful outcome.

It may be best for you to start by making an appointment with an orthopedic surgeon. Since some conditions are clearly identified with a physical exam or seen on X-ray, arthroscopy may not be needed at all. Dominic Carreira MD, and Charles A. Bush-Joseph MD. Hip Arthroscopy. In Orthopedics. June 2006. Vol. 29. No. 6. Pp. 517-525.

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
All content provided by eORTHOPOD® is a registered trademark of Medical Multimedia Group, L.L.C.. Content is the sole property of Medical Multimedia Group, LLC and used herein by permission.

Our Specialties

Where Does It Hurt?

Our Locations

  Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook Follow us on YouTube
Follow us on Twitter