Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Hip FAQ

Question:

Can you tell us what is a reverse intertrochanteric fracture?

Answer:

A hip fracture is a break in the femur (thighbone) at the upper end of the shaft near the hip joint. There are many subtypes of hip fractures. One of the most common is the intertrochanteric fracture. With this type of hip fracture, there is a break or fracture line between two bony bumps on the femur (thigh bone). The larger bump on the upper outer part of the femur is the greater trochanter. The bump on the inside (medial) part of the femur is the lesser trochanter. A line between these two bumps forms the intertrochanteric line. In reverse oblique fractures, the major fracture line extends from proximal-medial (upper-inner side of the shaft) to the distal-lateral (lower outer side). This means the fracture line goes in the opposite diagonal direction as the typical intertrochanteric fracture. Treatment is usually with surgery to pin or fix the two sides of the bone in place while the fracture site heals. The surgeon monitors the patient carefully for any signs that the fracture is becoming (or has become) unstable (slips). If this happens, a second operation may be needed to stabilize the fracture site and prevent malunion or nonunion and any deformity that might occur with such a healing displacement. Sheldon Lichtblau, MD. The Unstable Intertrochanteric Hip Fracture. In Orthopedics. August 2008. Vol. 31. No. 8. Pp. 792-797.

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
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