Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Hip FAQ

Question:

I had a hip joint resurfacing about three months ago. I'm still having quite a bit of pain, and I can't bend down to pick my shoes up off the floor. Is this normal?

Answer:

Post-operative recovery following hip joint resurfacing is under study right now. There aren't too many details available to tell us how other patients are doing three months, six months, or one year or more after the procedure.

Pain that persists past the three-month mark is not considered normal. It's more likely classified as chronic pain. Having enough hip joint motion to bend down and pick up items off the floor can be a problem for some patients. With the right rehab program, it should be something you can do.

Using a handheld device made especially for this task can help. But ideally, it would be better to gain enough motion and strength to accomplish this task on your own. And if you are having trouble putting on shoes and socks, it's likely that there are other areas of function that are a problem, too.

A second phase of rehab may be needed for patients who have had a hip joint resurfacing procedure. Once you have been discharged from the hospital, you have a home program of exercises given to you by the physical therapist.

But three months later, your needs have changed. A follow-up evaluation would be helpful at that time to redirect patients and gear the home program towards improving function. The focus may still be improving strength, motion, and balance. But the outcomes can be measured in terms of what you can and can't do.

Talk to your surgeon about your situation. Or visit your physical therapist for a follow-up appointment. Now that there isn't an immediate concern about hip dislocation, your program can be modified to increase hip motion needed for bending activities. Meredith A. Newman, MSc, MCSP, et al. Outcomes After Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing: Could We Achieve Better Function? In Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. April 2008. Vol. 89. No. 4. Pp. 660-666.

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
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