Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Ankle FAQ

Question:

Last week I sprained my ankle when I was dancing on carpeting in tennis shoes. I have a big dance showcase coming up in about two months. Will my ankle be better by then?

Answer:

The first few days after an ankle sprain are key to recovery. Ice, compression, and elevation are needed to keep the normal inflammatory process from going overboard. Too much swelling in the area can delay recovery.

The first few days after an ankle sprain are key to recovery. Ice, compression, and elevation are needed to keep the normal inflammatory process from going overboard. Too much swelling in the area can delay recovery.The first few days after an ankle sprain are key to recovery. Ice, compression, and elevation are needed to keep the normal inflammatory process from going overboard. Too much swelling in the area can delay recovery.

Damage to the receptors of the ligaments, tendons, and muscles can also result in impaired proprioception. Proprioception is the joint's ability to sense change in position. This is very important for a dancer.

It makes good sense for a dancer to follow an ankle rehab program after an injury of this type. Decreased muscle strength and change in proprioception increase your risk of another ankle sprain.

Most soft tissue injuries are healed after four to six weeks. Recovery of normal function may take a little longer. Since this only just happened a week ago, you're in time to get the help you need in time for your show.

Valter Santilli, MD, et al. Peroneus Longus Muscle Activation Pattern During Gait Cycle in Athletes Affected by Functional Ankle Instability. In American Journal of Sports Medicine. August 2005. Vol. 33. No. 8. Pp. 1183-1187.

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
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