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Ankle News

Payment for Another's Labor: Strengthening One Ankle Crosses Over to the Other

It's like getting paid for someone else's work. In a phenomenon called the crossover effect, the muscles of one ankle get stronger even when exercises are done only by the opposite ankle.

Researchers measured crossover improvements by comparing two groups of people. Half went through eight weeks of a supervised strengthening program for one ankle using specialized equipment. The other group did normal activities and avoided exercise for the legs. Afterwards, the people in the training group had as much as a 19% improvement in muscles of the untrained ankle.

The authors present a variety of theories on how this could happen. Of the many possibilities, they find it most likely that the nerves going to the muscles on one side of the body cause an effect on the same exact muscles on the other side of the body. The researchers suggest that this crossover effect is most likely controlled by the central nervous system. The authors are optimistic that people who are unable to use their ankle due to injury or surgery could benefit from the crossover effect by using the efforts of one ankle to keep the other ankle strong.


Benjamin S. Uh, MD, et al. The Benefit of a Single-Leg Strength Training Program for the Muscles Around the Untrained Ankle: A Prospective, Randomized, Control Study. In The American Journal of Sports Medicine. July/August 2000. Vol. 28. No. 4. Pp. 568-573.

02/21/2001

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
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