Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Foot FAQ

Question:

Do you think it makes any difference what kind of shoes I wear when I run? I don't run far -- maybe a mile. I try to get out two or three times a week. I have flatfeet and I don't want to injure myself running.

Answer:

Sometimes the type of shoes worn does make a difference. Even more important is making sure your shoes aren't too run down and ready for the garbage. Many people wait too long to replace their running shoes.

Without proper support, injuries are more likely. This is especially true for folks with flat feet or other foot problems.

Studies show that running patterns change as you increase your mileage. The foot tends to pronate or flatten more during the landing phase of running. The load and impact on the foot increases as well. Stress along the medial (arch) side of the foot to the bottom of the big toe increases. So does the risk of injury.

Shoes with a special motion control design can help with this problem. This technology is fairly common. You should have no trouble finding this type of shoe. The most popular type has two different types of materials in the midsole of the shoe. Force, load, and position of the heel can be changed depending on where softer or firmer materials are placed. Roy T. H. Cheung, BSc(Hons)PT, and Gabriel Y. F. Ng, PhD, MPhty, PDPT. Influence of Different Footwear on Force of Landing During Running. In Physical Therapy. May 2008. Vol. 88. No. 5. Pp. 620-628.

*Disclaimer:* The information contained herein is compiled from a variety of sources. It may not be complete or timely. It does not cover all diseases, physical conditions, ailments or treatments. The information should NOT be used in place of visit with your healthcare provider, nor should you disregard the advice of your health care provider because of any information you read in this topic.
All content provided by eORTHOPOD® is a registered trademark of Medical Multimedia Group, L.L.C.. Content is the sole property of Medical Multimedia Group, LLC and used herein by permission.

Our Specialties

Where Does It Hurt?

Our Locations

  Follow Us

Follow us on Facebook Follow us on YouTube
Follow us on Twitter